Skip to content

National Natural Landmark part IV

July 16, 2012

Leala Shoreline

IV. Site:  Leala Shoreline, Tutuila, American Samoa

      Description:  The Leala Shoreline is a rugged and spectacular exposure of basaltic rock identified as the Leone Basalt.  Interbedded with the basalt flows are layers of tuff.  The fringe above the upper limits of erosion by wave action is covered with dense tropical vegetation.  The basaltic rocks in the intertidal zone and the gently sloping shelt toward the sea are riven with fractures and pitted with pools creating a remarkable ecological environment.  The marine life in the pools is constantly replenished by breaking waves and rising tides.  One of the pools is approximately 100 ft. long and more than 12 feet deep.  The waves breaking against the steep basalt rock facing the sea presents an awesome spectacle.  This land and water area of 35 acres is located on the southwest coast of Tutuila Island just south of the village of Taputimu.

    Significance:  The eminent geologist of Harvard University, the late Professor R.A. Daly, refers to the Leone Basalt as “this special young flow” and explains that this basalt is vastly more recent than the major episode of volcanism which created the Samoan archipelago.  The outstanding quality of the Leala shoreline geologically is equaled only by its significance as a natural ecological exhibit.

We apologize for an error in our photos. Last week we posted the same photo as Fogamma Crater but it was actually for Leala Shoreline. Thank you for your patience and understanding.

8 Comments leave one →
  1. Anonymous permalink
    July 16, 2012 3:31 pm

    So are you going to post a picture of the Crater?

    • American Samoa Ranger permalink*
      July 20, 2012 5:52 pm

      We are working on trying to locate a high resolution photo of Fogamaa Crater. The crater has been turned into a taro plantation so its hard to see the actual crater in plain sight!

      • Anonymous permalink
        July 31, 2012 11:06 am

        Thanks for responding. Am I understanding correctly that a National Natural Landmark was turned into a taro plantation? If so, I assume that happened prior to the NNL designation, but how did it get designated given that change? Maybe I’ve misunderstood….

      • American Samoa Ranger permalink*
        August 13, 2012 10:00 am

        Thank you for your question. According to a senior member of the park, the NNL designation for Fogamaa Crater was done in 1972, but it already had been turned into a plantation by the owner of the land. Due to the significance of the crater itself, even with the plantation, it was still designated a NNL.

      • Chris Barns permalink
        August 13, 2012 12:52 pm

        Fascinating. Thank you so much. It must indeed be a special place.

      • American Samoa Ranger permalink*
        August 13, 2012 3:27 pm

        Please look out for the re-post of the subject of Fogamaa with the actual photo.

      • Anonymous permalink
        August 13, 2012 6:06 pm

        Yes — thanks much for following up on this.

      • American Samoa Ranger permalink*
        August 13, 2012 10:03 am

        Thank you for your question. The NNL designation for Fogamaa Crater was done in 1972. When it was designated it had already been turned into a plantation by the owner of the land. But due to the significance of the crater it received that designation.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

Gravatar
WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 232,880 other followers

Build a website with WordPress.com
%d bloggers like this: