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It’s Not Easy Being Green…in a Desert

May 30, 2013
During 2011 and 2012, Pu'ukohola Heiau National Historic Site only received 6.38 inches of rain. (NPS Photo)

Over the past couple of years, this is the view visitors to Pu’ukohola Heiau National Historic Site were greeted with: a dry landscape being affected by years of drought. During 2012,  the park received only 2.9 inches of rain the entire year…not much more than Death Valley during the same time period (NPS Photo)

After about five years of severe to exceptional drought conditions, Pu’ukohola Heiau National Historic Site on Hawaii Island has finally received some much needed relief. Although it may not seem like a lot of rain to some, the 8.53 inches of precipitation received this month is more than all the rainfall the park received during all of 2011 and 2012 combined! (NPS Photo)

Today, after about five years of severe to exceptional drought conditions, Pu’ukohola Heiau National Historic Site on Hawaii Island has finally received some much needed relief. Although it may not seem like a lot of rain to some, the 8.53 inches of precipitation received this month is more than all the rainfall the park received during all of 2011 and 2012 combined! (NPS Photo taken May 30, 2013)

Much of this month's precipitation fell during three separate rainfall events...the heaviest dumping nearly 5 inches of rain in a matter of about an hour! (NPS Photo taken May 30, 2013)

Much of this month’s precipitation fell during three separate rainfall events…the heaviest dumping nearly 5 inches of rain in a matter of about an hour! (NPS Photo taken May 30, 2013)

The normally dry leeward side of Kohala Mountain on Hawaii Island has quickly changed its appearance from dull brown and reds to vibrant greens. (NPS Photo taken May 30, 2013)

The normally dry leeward side of Kohala Mountain on Hawaii Island has quickly changed its appearance from dull brown and reds to vibrant greens. (NPS Photo taken May 30, 2013)

Although beneficial, more rainfall is needed to break the severe drought that has been affecting the leeward (west) side of Hawaii Island. (Click to be taken to the U.S. Drought Monitor website)

Although beneficial, more rainfall is needed to break the severe drought that has been affecting the leeward (west) side of Hawaii Island. (Click to be taken to the U.S. Drought Monitor website)

Pu`ukohola Heiau rises above Pelekane Bay on the Island of Hawaii. It was here in the early 1790's that King Kamehameha the Great began his epic unification of the Hawaiian Islands. (Photo used by permission)

Pu`ukohola Heiau rises above Pelekane Bay on the Island of Hawaii. It was here during the 1790’s that King Kamehameha the Great began his epic unification of the Hawaiian Islands. Today, Pu’ukohola Heiau National Historic Site preserves King Kamehameha’s temple as well as other sites associated with the unification of Hawaii. (Photo used by permission)

For more information about Pu’ukohola Heiau National Historic Site, visit the park’s website: www.nps.gov/puhe

One Comment leave one →
  1. Hawaii Big Island Travel Guru permalink
    May 30, 2013 6:20 pm

    What a wonderful post, sharing great news and beautiful photos of green! :)

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