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A welcome on the blue water trails of Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail

September 5, 2013
Hokulea at Hookena

Hokulea at Hookena

For generations, inhabitants of Hawaii have reflected their deep aloha by sharing what they have. In the past, most visitors would frequently arrive by ocean using it as their trail. The voyaging canoe, Hokule`a, spent part of the summer on the Big island visiting various ports of call along the west side of the island including Miloli`i, Ho`okena, Keauhou, Kawaihae and other places located along the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail corridor. In late July, about 100 people at Ho`okena welcomed the canoe with chants, leis, food and aloha. The veteran and beginner crew members were greeted by the huge hospitality of this small community. After a short talk and and reminding everyone that Hokule`a belongs to all of us, many swan out to visit and enjoy Hokule`a.

Hokule`a will be starting her 4-5 year worldwide journey around the planet in 2014. The core message of this endeavor is Malama Honua “Care for Island Earth” – our natural environment, children and all mankind. Ala Kahakai staff and related community members helped with various events of the 2013 visit of Hokule`a. Click the link to find out how Ala Kahakai NHT staff member Nahaku Kalei shared the canoe culture with Konawaena Middle School students. http://hokulea.org/education/learning-journey-konawaena-middle-school-wave-warriors-august-9-2013/

From the inspiration of traditional Hawaiian canoes, a new youth canoe sailing program, Na Pe`a, will be starting up in Keauhou this year. Ala Kahakai NHT, Ala Kahakai Trail Association and Nakoa Foundation are partnering together for this. The eventual goal is to have a similar youth program in many communities along the trail and use canoes for resource management whether it be for restoring opelu fishing or other traditions of those places. It will also provide a fossil fuel free mode of transportation for trail maintenance and visitation.

A hui hou Hokule`a. E kipa mai, e Na Pe`a.

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