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What’s Going on with Kīlauea?

September 25, 2013

What’s going on with Kīlauea, you ask? Kīlauea continues to erupt from 2 locations. Within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, at Halema‘uma‘u, the lava lake is about 150 feet deep within the crater (give or take) and the best viewing of this eruption is from the Jaggar Museum observation deck, open 24 hours a day. Go after dark or before dawn for the best eruption viewing, and the most amazing “glow show” in the park!

the glow show

Halema‘uma‘u aglow. NPS Photo/Michael Szoenyi

Out in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone, Pu’u ‘Ō’ō continues to erupt, but there are currently no flows entering the ocean or pooling up on the coastal plain. According to the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, active breakouts in the Kahauale’a 2 area are scattered over a broad area within the state’s Natural Area Reserve, extremely hazardous and closed to the public. In this aerial photo of the Kahauale’a 2 eruption, a breakout near the edge of the forest engulfs trees and burns dead foliage.

Active breakouts on the Kahaualeʻa 2 are scattered over a broad area. Here, a breakout near the edge of the forest engulfs trees and burns dead foliage. USGS HVO photo

Active breakouts on the Kahaualeʻa 2 are scattered over a broad area. Here, a breakout near the edge of the forest engulfs trees and burns dead foliage. USGS HVO photo

Be sure to check out the daily Kīlauea eruption updates provided by the scientists at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, and bookmark this page: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/activity/kilaueastatus.php.

Small-scale map courtesy of USGS HVO showing Kīlauea’s east rift zone flow field as of September 19, 2013. The Peace Day flow (light orange), remains active…barely. Two small breakouts (red) are leaking from the tube on the upper flow field and at the upper boundary of the Royal Gardens subdivision. The tube below this lower point has been abandoned, so no lava is reaching the coastal plain or entering the ocean. Near Puʻu ʻŌʻō, the inactive Kahaualeʻa flow from early 2013 is pink, while the active Kahaualeʻa 2 flow north of Puʻu ʻŌʻō is shown in brighter shades of red—light red is the flow area as mapped on August 27, and bright red shows flow widening since then. Older lava flows are labeled with the years in which they were active: episodes 1–48b flows (1983–1986) are shown in gray; episodes 48c–49 flows (1986–1992) are pale yellow; episodes 50–55 flows (1992–2007) are tan; and episodes 58–60 flows (2007–2011) are pale orange. The active lava tubes are shown with yellow lines. (see large map)

Small-scale map courtesy of USGS HVO showing Kīlauea’s east rift zone flow field as of September 19, 2013. The Peace Day flow (light orange), remains active…barely. Two small breakouts (red) are leaking from the tube on the upper flow field and at the upper boundary of the Royal Gardens subdivision. The tube below this lower point has been abandoned, so no lava is reaching the coastal plain or entering the ocean. Near Puʻu ʻŌʻō, the inactive Kahaualeʻa flow from early 2013 is pink, while the active Kahaualeʻa 2 flow north of Puʻu ʻŌʻō is shown in brighter shades of red—light red is the flow area as mapped on August 27, and bright red shows flow widening since then. Older lava flows are labeled with the years in which they were active: episodes 1–48b flows (1983–1986) are shown in gray; episodes 48c–49 flows (1986–1992) are pale yellow; episodes 50–55 flows (1992–2007) are tan; and episodes 58–60 flows (2007–2011) are pale orange. The active lava tubes are shown with yellow lines. (see large map)

One Comment leave one →
  1. rednalu permalink
    September 26, 2013 1:55 pm

    Reblogged this on kapa kulture.

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