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Lava Flow Continues Advancing Northeast in Kaohe Homesteads

September 18, 2014

The June 27th lava flow remains active and continues advancing northeast in the forested, northwest portion of Kaohe Homesteads. The flow front today was 2.7 km (1.7 miles) from Apaʻa st. and 3.8 km (2.3 miles) from Pāhoa Village Road. Over past two days, the flow front has advanced at an average rate of 290 m/day (960 ft/day). (USGS)

The following photos and video were released by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (USGS) (Dated September 17, 2014) . Note: these photos and video were not taken in areas currently accessible to the public. (You can visit the official website of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park for current information on the areas of Kilauea that are open to public). Click here to see photos from previous post.

A view looking down the axis of the flow at the flow front. Pāhoa is in the upper right portion of the photograph. (USGS)

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. The latitude and longitude of the flow front on September 17 was 19.4737016 /-154.977834 (Decimal degrees; WGS84). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the digital elevation model (DEM) perfectly represents the earth’s surface. But, DEMs are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on the flow behavior over the past several days and the local topography. (USGS)

A close-up view of the flow surface near the flow front, which consisted of numerous, scattered small pāhoehoe lobes. (USGS)

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 as a base image to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The purple arrows show the projected path of the flow over the coming two weeks, based on the current flow activity and local topography. Lava flow behavior is complex and this projection is subject to change. Satellite image provided by Digital Globe. (USGS)

A view of the leading tip of the flow, which was moving through thick forest. (USGS)

CLICK PHOTO TO WATCH VIDEO: This Quicktime movie provides a brief aerial overview of activity at the flow front. Kaohe Homesteads is in the lower left. (USGS)

This thermal image shows the scattered pāhoehoe lobes that are active near the front of the June 27th flow. (USGS)

The summit eruption continues, with an active lava lake within Halemaʻumaʻu Crater. Halemaʻumaʻu fills up most of the image, and the lava lake can be seen near the bottom of the image contained within the smaller Overlook crater. (USGS)

A closer look at the lava lake at Kīlauea’s summit. The lake was roughly 53 m (170 ft) below the floor of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater this morning. (USGS)

The following photos and video were released on September 15, 2014:

A closer view of surface activity on the June 27th lava flow. This pāhoehoe flow consists of many small, scattered, slow-moving lobes burning vegetation. (USGS)

HVO geologists conduct a VLF (very-low frequency) survey to measure the rate of lava flowing through the lava tube on the June 27th lava flow. (USGS)

An HVO geologist conducts a very-low frequency (VLF) survey of the lava tube to measure the rate of lava flowing through the tube. The measurement consists of two steps. First, a transect of VLF measurements across the roof of the tube is used to measure the cross-sectional area of lava flowing through the tube. Second, a radar gun is used to measure the speed that lava is flowing at that location. An open skylight is required for this speed measurement. By multiplying the cross-sectional area with the velocity, the volume rate of lava flowing through the tube can be estimated. Today’s measurement showed a flow rate of 5.8 cubic meters per second (roughly 1500 gallons per second). Tracking the lava supply rate like this can be helpful for anticipating fluctuations in activity at the flow front.(USGS)

CLICK PHOTO TO WATCH VIDEO: This Quicktime movie shows the view through a skylight on the lava tube, which provided a clear view of the flowing lava stream. (USGS)

CLICK PHOTO TO WATCH VIDEO: This Quicktime movie provides an aerial view of activity near the front of the June 27th flow, where numerous pāhoehoe lobes are slowly burning vegetation. (USGS)

 

 

 

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